Tag Archives: drawing

Inktober & Procreate Inktober: Completed

Today is the final day of Inktober 2018 and Procreate Inktober. There were a couple times I questioned if I could do two drawings a day for 31 days, but I was able to complete it (some drawings were better than others). Thankfully, having the list of prompts allowed me to draw ahead of schedule for days I knew I would be too busy to complete two drawings.

 

Inktober gave me a chance to test out different styles of drawing as well as different software and media. I mostly used Procreate and Affinity Designer on the iPad Pro, but I also experimented with different types of pens, which you can watch on my YouTube Inktober Playlist.

 

As the name implies, I only used Procreate for the iPad to draw all of the Procreate Inktober drawings. I tried to include a lot of references to things I enjoy to see if any of my social media followers also liked the same things. A few references I used were Ducktales, Ghostbusters, Futurama, The Midnight, and a plethora of puns.

If you’re interested in seeing all of my drawings, check out my Twitter and Instagram accounts. How did you do? Were you able to complete all 31 days?

Inktober 2018

October is quickly approaching, which means it’s almost time to begin Inktober 2018. Inktober was originally started by Jake Parker in 2009, and has gained more and more participants each year. This is when people all over the world ink one drawing each day in October to a daily theme. Most people use paper and ink, but if you’re like me and tend not to carry around pens, ink, brushes, and paper, you can also participate digitally, which is what I did for last year’s challenge.

Above are some of the drawings I did last year while beta-testing a new version of Procreate for iOS. In case you couldn’t tell, I like to draw a lot of nostalgic-based artwork. You can check out some of the retro t-shirts I’ve made at my home page if you’re also into that sort of thing.

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Inktober 2018 Prompt List

This year, I’ll probably alternate between Procreate and Affinity Designer for iOS since I always have my iPad Pro on me.

When you complete your daily drawing, be sure to tag it on social media using #inktober and #inktober2018 so everyone can check out each other’s work. There are a lot of very impressive pieces done each year, which can be pretty inspiring to see.

Let me know if you’ll be participating this year!

Office Revamp

One thing that seems to obstruct my workflow is clutter. If I’m trying to work and I notice that my office is in disarray, 99% of the time I’ll stop working to clean and organize. This is how my office used to look:

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So last weekend I decide to give it a little facelift in hopes of sparking some inspiration and creativity.

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With less clutter and a new coat of paint, my office feels bigger and cleaner, which gives me a lot less distractions throughout the day. Since the office revamp, I’ve started learning Apple’s new Swift programming language and have been practicing new techniques in digital painting.

If you’re looking for some great instructional videos on creating digital artwork, I strongly suggest checking out Folio Academy. They offer everything from children’s book app artwork videos to animation and even painting.

Corona Geek Guest Appearance

This past Monday I gave a presentation on Corona Geek about different graphics software that can be used to create app artwork. Check out the video with show notes here: http://coronalabs.com/blog/coronageek/corona-geek-hangout-92/ or just watch the video below.

Going from Analog to Digital

I recently watched “Dear Mr. Watterson“, the new documentary about Calvin and Hobbes’ and their creator. It reminded me of how my childhood dream was to become a cartoonist. Seeing current cartoonists still drawing on paper inspired me to pick up a sketchbook and a pen again. I actually haven’t drawn on a piece of paper since I was first able to afford my first Wacom tablet in 2005.

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Dear Mr. Watterson – All rights reserved & copyright owned by creators.

I was quickly reminded of how much I rely on digital luxuries like undo, straight line, color picker, copy, paste, etc. Regular drawing is a lot more difficult than I remember.

After I drew some crude initial character sketches, I decided I might want to use the drawings in my latest app for Maddie Bear Books. Instead of using my wireless scanner to scan in the pages to my computer, I decided to use my iPhone, which was already in my pocket. I took a picture of the sketch, dropped it over to my Macbook using DeskConnect and imported it into Adobe Flash.

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There’s a feeling of something very native of drawing with pen and paper that I had forgotten about. Something about the feel of the pen or pencil touching the rough surface of paper that digital tablets can’t seem to replicate. I still prefer to color and finalize drawings digitally, but it’s a nice break from a computer screen.

Overview: Mischief

I’m always looking for new software that makes creating mobile apps and artwork easier or even just makes the process more fun. Last night, I discovered Mischief drawing software, and I have to say, I’m pretty impressed. You can go to their website www.MadeWithMischief.com and download a free 15-day trial to test out for yourself. If you like it, a full license is only $65 USD.

So what is Mischief? I think it’s a cross-between Sketchbook Pro and Adobe Flash, which if you follow my blog and tutorials, you know I’m a huge fan of both (Flash CS6 at least, I’m still iffy about Flash CC). It has a user interface similar to Sketchbook Pro, but instead of bitmap, it’s vector-based, allowing you to zoom-in infinitely to draw the smallest details. Since it’s similar to Sketchbook Pro, the interface is very straightforward and not much is hidden in submenus up in the toolbar. It has the ability to export JPEG and .PSD files, so if you are a Photoshop user, you can enhance your artwork further. I’ll probably use the .PSD export feature to convert my files into .PNGs for mobile applications.

Although it isn’t necessary, they do recommend that you use Mischief with a drawing tablet to get the full-effect. This is true of just about all drawing software, though. If you’re fortunate enough to have a Wacom graphics tablet at your disposal, I think you’ll really enjoy using Mischief. Without even going into my Wacom preferences, Mischief already allowed my “Undo” shortcut button to function and pressure sensitivity works flawlessly. In all honesty, I think Mischief is more responsive to a drawing stylus than Adobe Flash.

If I had to list any negatives about Mischief, I would say it’s the lack of a paint bucket tool. I know it’s more geared towards artists who color in layers with different types of brushes, but I’m still a huge fan of being able to paint a large area with a single click. If they were to add a paint bucket tool, I might switch over completely from Flash to create artwork for mobile applications.

Overall, I would definitely recommend checking out Mischief if you like to draw. I know I’m going to be utilizing the 15 day trial as much as I can. Check out my demo video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjY-mzuArQs or watch it below.

App Review: DoInk

As many of you probably already know, Wacom announced their new mobile tablet line, which allows digital illustrators to draw on the go. This is a great idea, but many people aren’t too fond of being tied to Windows or Android operating systems, or dropping $1600-$2500 USD for the luxury to be mobile. Wacom also announced a pressure-sensitive stylus for the iPad for a more reasonable $100 USD, but it doesn’t have much of a benefit if your drawing app of choice doesn’t support it.

So lately I’ve been the hunt for a good drawing app that is similar to Adobe Flash and supports Wacom’s new stylus, does animation, vector lines, .PNG exporting, canvas resizing, and has features like pencil, paint brush and paint bucket. After downloading about 20 drawing apps, I’ve come to the conclusion it doesn’t exist or I still have yet to find it. A few I’ve tried are Sketchbook Pro, Sketchbook Ink, Adobe Ideas, Animation Desk, iDraw, Paper, Penultimate, Bamboo Paper, Skitch, Drawing Pad, Procreate, Artrage, ArtStudio, Inkist, and FlipInk.

Charles McKeever (@CoronaGeek) mentioned DoInk to me a few days ago, but before I bought another drawing app that didn’t fit the bill, I first decided to email the company who makes it. I asked if it supports individual .png exporting and Wacom’s new pen. To my surprise, DoInk is created by one developer who gave a prompt response saying those items were on his to-do list, but it’s difficult implementing everything he would like to see in the app. As an individual developer myself, I completely understand the balance of features you want to create and time available to do so.

I decided to give DoInk a shot, especially since I figured it’d be a fun app and it’d support a fellow indie app developer. The app is very similar to Adobe Flash, which was a great surprise. The lines aren’t vector, but they’re still pretty crisp and there is paint bucket support. The user interface is pretty intuitive, as soon as I opened the app I was able to draw a character and animate him. Once you have your animation drawn, you can overlay it on top of a background drawing, a pre-made background, or even a picture from your camera roll. Then when your scene is setup, you can export the video to your camera roll. From there you can send it to your DropBox or even edit it in iMovie.

So is DoInk the drawing app I’ve been searching for? Not really, it doesn’t support .png exporting or Wacom’s pen yet. Is it a lot of fun to use? Yes, it’s nice being able to create Flash-like animations on the go. Honestly, I think I might be stuck to sitting at a desk when it comes to drawing artwork for my apps, but DoInk is definitely a great app when you want to animate away from your computer chair. If you’re looking for a good animation app, definitely pick this one up.