Tag Archives: vector

Affinity Designer

A few years ago, I was commissioned to create an online course about Affinity Designer. This was when Affinity Designer was still fairly new and not a ton of illustrators used it. Fast-forward three and a half years, and it’s become one of the best graphics applications for both desktop and iPads.

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Affinity Designer for Windows interface

Truth be told, just based on the work I had after creating the course, I stopped using Affinity Designer for awhile. When I heard they were debuting a version for the iPad, I quickly regained interest and bought it on its release day. It immediately became one of my favorite iOS apps that I own and I’ve used it almost every day since.

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Affinity Designer for iPad

The iPad version is full-featured and not just a watered down version. Also, sticking to Serif’s business plan, there are no subscription payments involved, everything is buy-once, keep forever. It’s definitely worth your time to watch their tutorial videos about using gestures to control the app, as they’ve done a great job translating mouse clicks into finger gestures.

Since the iPad version release, I’ve been drawing in Affinity Designer so much that I had to update my website to display all of the new illustrations I’ve completed. Everything from t-shirt designs, concept art, and final products that I’ve used for my day job have been done all on my iPad.

GP Animations
http://www.GPAnimations.com

I love that if I’m on the go, I can just grab my iPad and take the project I had open on my PC or MacBook and open it in the iOS version of Designer. It’s really as simple as just opening the file from Dropbox or Google Drive and finishing your work on the go.

I also have the PC, MacOS, and iOS versions of Affinity Photo, but I haven’t had a chance to use them extensively yet. I did play around with some of the features for some quick photo editing and it seemed pretty intuitive just like Designer.

AffinityPhoto
Affinity Photo interface

Overall, if you haven’t tried Affinity Designer and Affinity Photo and you’re tired of paying for Adobe Creative Cloud, you really should check them out. If you’re an Adobe InDesign user, they’re also making Affinity Publisher, which is currently in Beta as of the time of this writing. Now if I could only get them to make an Adobe Animate CC replacement, I could completely drop all Adobe products…

Affinity Designer Video Tutorial Course

I was recently commissioned by Stone River eLearning to create a video tutorial course teaching Affinity Designer. I’m really impressed by the number of features that the software has to offer for the reasonable one-time fee.

It lets you do photo editing like Photoshop, create vector artwork like Illustrator, and even has built-in tools for slicing artwork for mobile application and website design. I was so impressed with it, I used it to create the artwork for my next Construct 2 video tutorial series, which is currently in production.

If you’re interest in checking out the software, click here and if you’d like to learn how to use all of the features, check out my course here.

Overview: Mischief

I’m always looking for new software that makes creating mobile apps and artwork easier or even just makes the process more fun. Last night, I discovered Mischief drawing software, and I have to say, I’m pretty impressed. You can go to their website www.MadeWithMischief.com and download a free 15-day trial to test out for yourself. If you like it, a full license is only $65 USD.

So what is Mischief? I think it’s a cross-between Sketchbook Pro and Adobe Flash, which if you follow my blog and tutorials, you know I’m a huge fan of both (Flash CS6 at least, I’m still iffy about Flash CC). It has a user interface similar to Sketchbook Pro, but instead of bitmap, it’s vector-based, allowing you to zoom-in infinitely to draw the smallest details. Since it’s similar to Sketchbook Pro, the interface is very straightforward and not much is hidden in submenus up in the toolbar. It has the ability to export JPEG and .PSD files, so if you are a Photoshop user, you can enhance your artwork further. I’ll probably use the .PSD export feature to convert my files into .PNGs for mobile applications.

Although it isn’t necessary, they do recommend that you use Mischief with a drawing tablet to get the full-effect. This is true of just about all drawing software, though. If you’re fortunate enough to have a Wacom graphics tablet at your disposal, I think you’ll really enjoy using Mischief. Without even going into my Wacom preferences, Mischief already allowed my “Undo” shortcut button to function and pressure sensitivity works flawlessly. In all honesty, I think Mischief is more responsive to a drawing stylus than Adobe Flash.

If I had to list any negatives about Mischief, I would say it’s the lack of a paint bucket tool. I know it’s more geared towards artists who color in layers with different types of brushes, but I’m still a huge fan of being able to paint a large area with a single click. If they were to add a paint bucket tool, I might switch over completely from Flash to create artwork for mobile applications.

Overall, I would definitely recommend checking out Mischief if you like to draw. I know I’m going to be utilizing the 15 day trial as much as I can. Check out my demo video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjY-mzuArQs or watch it below.